WannaCry Attacks: Microsoft Criticised for Not Offering Free Patches to ‘Unsupported’ Windows XP Users Earlier

WannaCry Attacks: Microsoft Criticised for Not Offering Free Patches to 'Unsupported' Windows XP Users Earlier

US software giant Microsoft has withdrawn the distribution of the free security update that could protect computers from the world of cybernetics WannaCry, the Financial Times reported on Thursday.

In mid-March, Microsoft released a security update after detecting a security flaw in its XP operating system that allows the WannaCry reference system to infiltrate and freeze computers last week.

However, the software giant has sent the free security update – or patch – users to the latest version of the Windows 10 operating system, according to the report.

Older software users, like Windows XP, had to pay heavy support costs, he added.

“The high price highlights the dilemma facing the world’s largest software company, trying to force customers to switch to newer, more secure software,” he said.

A Microsoft spokesman, based in the United States to AFP: “Microsoft offers custom support contracts as a security measure” for companies that choose not to upgrade their systems.
“To be clear, Microsoft would prefer that companies are improving and realizing all the advantages of the latest version rather than choosing a custom support.”

According to the FT, the cost of upgrading previous versions of Windows “from $ 200 (about Rs 13,000) per device in 2014, when regular support for XP ended at $ 400 (about 26 RS 000) the following year “While some customers were invited to pay additional fees.

The newspaper said the high costs led the British National Health Service – one of the first victims of the WannaCry attack – did not make the updates.

Microsoft finally distribute the patch for previous versions Friday – the day has detected ransomware.

Although the announcement was “too late to contain the outbreak of WannaCry,” the report said.

Microsoft has not confirmed the AFP when it made the free patch.

A group of hackers called Shadow Brokers released the malware in April, which claims to have discovered the defect of the NSA, according to Kaspersky Lab, a Russian provider of computer security

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